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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

John Berman
Co-Anchor New Day
CNNW 07/29/2015
Berman: The White House is rejecting a petition to pardon NSA leaker Edward Snowden. 168,000 people signed that petition. Administration officials say Snowden should return to the U.S. to face espionage charges.
Amy Goodman
Host and Executive Producer for Democracy Now
LINKTV 07/29/2015
Goodman: The White House has responded to a petition calling for the pardon of NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, two years after it received more than 100,000 signatures. That threshold is supposed to guarantee a response from the white house, but the response took more than two years. On Tuesday, Lisa Monaco, Obama's advisor on homeland security and counterterrorism, rejected the call for a pardon and called for Snowden to quote
Chris Christie
Gov. New Jersey
FOXNEWSW 08/06/2015
Christie: I'm the only person on this stage whose actually filed applications under the patriot act, who have gone before the foreign intelligence service court, who has prosecuted and investigated and jailed terrorists in this country after September 11th. I was appointed U.S. Attorney by President Bush on S10th, 2001. And the world changed enormously the next day. and it happened in my state. This not theoretical to me. I went to the funerals. we lost friends of ours in the trade center that day. My own wife was two blocks from the trade center that day at her office having gone to it that morning. When you actually have to be responsible for doing this you can do it and we did it for seven years in my office, respecting civil liberties and protecting the homeland. And I will make no apologies ever for protecting the lives and the safety of the American people. We have to give more tools to our folks to be able to do that not fewer and then trust those people and oversee them to do it the right way. As President, that is exactly what I'll do.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
FOXNEWSW 08/06/2015
Paul: I want to collect more records from terrorists, and less records from innocent Americans. The Fourth Amendment is what we fought the revolution over. John Adams said it was a spark that led to our war for independence and I'm proud of standing for the Bill of Rights and I will continue to stand for the Bill of Rights. Christie: And Megan, Megyn, that's -- that's a completely ridiculous answer. I want to collect more records from terrorists but less records from other people. How you supposed to know, Megyn how are you – Paul: Use the Fourth Amendment . Use the Fourth Amendment -- Get a warrant. Christie: Let me tell you something. Paul: Get a judge to sign a warrant. Christie: you know -- Senator – Kelly: Wait. Wait. Governor Christie make your point.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
FOXNEWSW 08/06/2015
Christie: When you're sitting in a subcommittee just blowing hot air about this you can say things like that. When you're responsible for protecting the lives of the American people then what you need to do is to make sure is to make sure that that the system works the way it's supposed to work. Paul: Here is the problem, Governor. You fundamentally misunderstand the bill of rights. Every time you did a case you got a warrant from a judge. I'm talking about searches without warrants indiscriminately of all Americans' records. And that's what I fought to end. I don't trust President Obama with our records. I know you gave him a big hug. If you want to give him a big hug again, go right ahead.
Zoe Lofgren
Representative (D-CA) member, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 08/13/2015
Lofgren: Last year the house voted 293-123 to close these back door loopholes, but the rules committee would not allow the house to vote today to put these fixes into this bill.
Adam Schiff
U.S. Representative D-CA, Member of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 08/13/2015
Schiff: So today in another moment of national danger we are challenged to reaffirm our commitment to these twin imperatives, security and liberty and to prove again that we can find the right balance for our times. The U.S.A. Freedom Act strikes that delicate but vitally important balance. On the side of freedom, it ends bulk collection, not just of telephone metadata under section 215 but of any bulk collection under any other authority. It creates a specific procedure for telephone metadata that allows the government, upon court approval, to query the data that the telephone companies already keep, something I've long advocated. It increases transparency by requiring a declassification review of all significant FISA court opinions and by requiring the government to provide the public with detailed information about how they use these national security authorities.
Adam Schiff
U.S. Representative D-CA, Member of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 08/13/2015
Schiff: And it provides for a panel of experts to advocate for privacy and civil liberties before the FISA court, also something I've advocated for quite some time. At the same time the U.S.A. Freedom Act of 2015 preserves important capabilities and makes further national security enhancements by closing loopholes that make it difficult for the government to track foreign terrorists and spies as they enter or leave the country clarifying the application of FISA to those who facilitate the international proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and increasing the maximum penalties for those who provide material support for terrorism.
Dutch Ruppersberger
U.S. Representative D-Maryland, Ranking Member on the Intelligence Committee
CSPAN 08/13/2015
Ruppersberger: I rise in strong support of The U.S.A. Freedom Act which virtually deletes the National Security Agency’s database of Americans' phone and email records. The bulk collection of what we know now as metadata will end. Under this bill the government will now have to seek court approval before petitioning private cell phone companies for records. The court will have to approve each application, except in emergencies and major court decisions will be made public. It is very similar to legislation drafted and introduced last year by the intelligence committee under the leadership of former Chairman Rogers and myself together with our colleagues on the judiciary committee led by Congressman Goodlatte and Conyers. That bill passed with an overwhelming bipartisan majority and I want to thank Congressman Goodlatte and Conyers as well as Congressman Schiff and Nunes, also Congressman Sensenbrenner and Jerry Nadler and other members who worked hard and continued the pursuit on this much-needed reform.
Dutch Ruppersberger
U.S. Representative D-Maryland, Ranking Member on the Intelligence Committee
CSPAN 08/13/2015
Ruppersberger: We need this bill, though, to keep our country safe. Section 215 of the Patriot Act which is the part that legalizes much of N.S.A.'s critical work to protect us from terrorists expires in less than three weeks, on June 1. If we do not re-authorize it with the reforms demanded by the public essential cape -- by the public, essential abilities to track suspects will expire also. This couldn't happen at a worse time. The threats posed by ISIS and other terrorist groups are just the tip of the iceberg. We also need strong defenses against increasingly aggressive cyberterrorists and the lone wolf terrorists that are often American citizens, for example this bill restores Americans' confidence that the government is not snooping on its own citizens by improving the necessary checks and balances to our democracy. This bill balances the need to protect our country with the need to protect our constitutional rights and civil liberties.
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